Cowboy Adventures During the Wild West


The Wild West

The Wild West refers to the period from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to around 1900.

It tells the stories of the pioneers, the settlers, the cattle kings, gold mining, railroads and steamboats, the cowboys, Indians, outlaws and gun slingers. https://www.westoverlaw.com/

Famous characters of the Wild West include Whyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, Bat Masterson, Billy the Kid, Calamity Jane and Belle Starr.

After the first European settlers arrived in America, many move westward seeking a new life and the promise of prosperity.

The West offered land, good soil for farming and new opportunities to get rich that could not be done in the East.

The Two-Fisted Town Tamer

Thomas James Smith, also known as “Bear River Smith” (12 June 1830 – 2 November 1870), was a lawman in the American Wild West and a marshal of cattle town, Abilene, Kansas.

Smith was a quiet-spoken lawman with a rugged reputation who came from New York City, where he worked as a police officer.

While working as a police officer in New York City in 1868, Smith was involved in the accidental killing of a fourteen-year-old boy, after which he resigned.

He also served as a lawman in small towns in Wyoming, Bear River and in Kit Carson, Colorado.

Marshal of Abilene

Abilene, Kansas, was a wild cattle town with numerous saloons, brothels and lawlessness.

From 1867, crime had increased to the point where murder and shootings were a regular occurrence.

Tom Smith was commissioned as Deputy US Marshal to bring law and order to Abilene in 1869 and insisted that he could enforce the law by using his fists rather than using guns.

Soon after taking office, Smith overpowered both, “Big Hank” Hawkins and “Wyoming Frank” and banished them from Abilene, after beating them both at the same time using only his bare hands.

Smith also introduced a “no guns in the town limits” law which was extremely unpopular.

Over the next two months, Smith survived two assassination attempts.

His tough reputation and several arrests of law-breakers led him to become widely respected and admired by the citizens of Abilene.

On the 2nd of November, 1870, Smith and a temporary deputy went to serve a warrant to Andrew McConnell and Moses Miles about the murder of another Abilene citizen.

They located the suspects ten miles outside of Abilene where a gunfight erupted.

Smith was badly wounded in the chest and his deputy fled the scene.

Moses Miles then took an axe and decapitated Tom Smith.

McConnell and Miles were captured and arrested in March 1871.

Andrew McConnell got 12 years in prison and Moses Miles spent 16 years and released.

Tom Smith was buried in Abilene, and a huge tombstone was erected with a plaque to honor his service in Abilene.

Smith was replaced as marshal by legendary lawman and gunfighter “Wild Bill” Hickock.

Ronald Reagan, as the host of the syndicated western television series, Death Valley Days, played Smith in the 1965 episode “No Gun Behind His Badge”.

Colter’s Run

John Colter (c.1770-1775 – May 7, 1812 or November 22, 1813) was a mountain man and explorer who was a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1803 to 1806 commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson, to explore and map the newly purchased American Northwest from Napoleonic France, and beyond after the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

Colter also became the first person of European descent to enter the region which later became Yellowstone National Park and to see the Teton Mountain Range during the winter of 1807-1808.

Blackfeet Indians

In 1809, Colter teamed up with John Potts, another former member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition to trap for beaver for the lucrative fur trade near the Jefferson River in what is now Montana when they encountered several hundred of the dreaded Blackfeet Indians while traveling by canoe.


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